Wed. Sep 28th, 2022
The question on my mind today is: Who is your queen? Who is your king?

It’s been especially on my mind as I watched Queen Elizabeth’s funeral and black America’s subsequent reaction, which has painted Elizabeth as a murdering, complicit colonist who doesn’t deserve praise or respect.

I’ve responded to the colonialist critique many times on previous programs and interviews. And I could easily respond to it now.

I think the more fruitful discussion lies in highlighting the stark contrast of how figures, such as Queen Elizabeth, are painted by woke scolds — and therefore many members of the black community — versus who they hold up and revere as heroes for the black community.

What you’ll notice immediately is that the black heroes are often criminals or, as I’ve repeatedly pointed out, characters who can easily be painted by the media as victims of an “oppressive” system. And black enemies are often figures with outstanding character, e.g. Queen Elizabeth.

The most recent example of this dichotomy comes from Uju Ana, a Nigerian professor from Carnegie Mellon. In response to the queen’s death, she tweeted something truly disgusting, vicious, and repulsive. “I heard the chief monarch of a thieving, raping, genocidal empire is finally dying. May her pain be excruciating,” she said.

I want to focus in on the word “raping.” You would assume that — because Uju so vehemently condemned it in the case of England — she would be against it in other cases.

Do you remember Jacob Blake? He was a black man who was fatally shot after his girlfriend called law enforcement on him over a “domestic dispute.” She had previously alleged she had been — I apologize if this is too graphic — digitally raped by him.

Uju Ana had something very different to say about rape then: “Jacob Blake is a family man. His sister Letetra Widman reminds us all that he has people and he is somebody’s people. No image you paint of him erases that.”

In other words, Uju Ana — and the media with her — doesn’t care that a black woman called law enforcement because she was obviously scared for her life. Nor did she care that Blake had been accused of digital rape.

This happens over and over again.

So again, who are the people we are told we should celebrate? Who are our kings and queens?

Consider Karen Attiya, a columnist for the ultra-woke Washington Post, who had a similar response to Queen Elizabeth’s death. She tweeted, “Black and brown people around the world who were subject to horrendous cruelties and economic deprivation under British colonialism are allowed to have feelings about Queen Elizabeth. After all, they were her subjects, too.”

But what did Karen — that’s a perfect name for her — say about George Floyd? Her words for Floyd were glowing. After his death, she suggested he win “Time’s Person of the Year.”

Floyd, who’s criminal record included multiple accounts of drug use, physical assault, and theft. Floyd, who’s alleged “victimhood” did nothing but damage to the inner-city communities destroyed by subsequent riots. Floyd, who’s name was used to legislate policies that have worsened crime in those same struggling communities. I explore Floyd’s troubled history extensively in my documentary “The Greatest Lie Ever Told,” which will drop very soon.

For Karen — and therefore the media and the Left — these hurting communities and their deeply rooted problems are never the focus. It’s always boogeymen like the white queen in Britain. Or it’s “uncle tom” Candace Owens, who has the audacity to criticize the heroes they crown.

This cancer destroying black Americans extends beyond the political sphere. It’s cultural as well.

So who’s our queen in black America today?

Beyoncé, who will often sexualize herself to sell products, is our new queen. And we have other idols. Rappers, who live and sing about degenerate lifestyles. What food products do we allow corporate America to sell us? Popeyes, sponsored by a wonderful role model in Megan Thee Stallion, or McDonald’s, sponsored by Travis Scott.

It’s time for black America to return to the thriving culture it had before the Left began the great welfare experiment. Believe it or not, black Americans, before the 1960s, were well married and outpacing white Americans in terms of economic growth — all while enduring Jim Crow laws.

But this fell apart when president Lyndon Baines Johnson, an avowed racist, extended a government hand and offered incentives for mothers to not marry fathers; the government became the new surrogate father.

Yes — it’s time black Americans reject the degenerate culture and crooked heroes that the Left will continue to push.

It’s time we find new kings and queens which display repute and character. Or else we will continue to be destroyed.

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